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Knee Osteoarthritis

Uncategorized Aug 11, 2020

Here at Be Mobile Physiotherapy, a lot of people come to us with Knee Osteoarthritis. Understandably, there are a lot of concerns and misconceptions surrounding this condition. Today we thought we would address some of these, but also provide some guidance around what to do to help improve your symptoms so that you can get moving and do the things you love.

 

Commonly Asked Questions: 

Q. I have been told that my knees are “worn out” or that “my knees have a lot of wear and tear”. Isn’t exercise doing more damage?
A. The joints in our bodies do not “wear out” like the metallic joints in car do. In fact, exercise is very important to keep our joints healthy and happy. Cartilage does not have a blood supply like our muscles and bones, so it has to get its nutrients from the surrounding synovial fluid in the joint. Think of cartilage like a sponge. When we exercise, we compress the sponge, and then when we recover the sponge...

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Warm-Up and Cool-Down

Uncategorized Aug 08, 2020

When you’re standing in the shower and you gradually turn down the hot tap, it’s an unpleasant but tolerable experience. Contrast that to standing in a hot shower,  a family member turns a tap on somewhere else and the water goes cold instantly. Most would agree this is a very unpleasant experience. This is because the stress of the cold water is a shock to our body systems. Exercise is another form of stress - so it's important to discuss how to reduce the initial shock of starting exercise and perhaps what to do once exercise is finished. This blog is all about warming up and cooling down!

 

Warming Up

An adequate warm up leaves you feeling ready to exercise, increases your performance during exercise and reduces your risk of injury. Effective warm-ups include two important components: 

  • General Activity
  • Specific Preparation

General Activity consists of 5-10 minutes any low intensity exercise that serves to increase body temperature and heart rate....

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Stretching

Uncategorized Aug 08, 2020

Flexibility has long been considered an important component of physical fitness so stretching has become a staple of many exercise programs. Unfortunately, nearly all the benefits people think they are getting from stretching don’t hold up when held up to the scientific research. This blog will address some of these misconceptions about stretching and make recommendations about how better to spend the time you dedicate to exercise. 

 

1. Stretching to warm up:

a. The research has categorically shown that stretching is not effective as a pre-exercise warm up - this is because pulling on the muscles by stretching does not increase their temperature and it can actually reduce your ability to produce explosive power before a workout. The best way to warm up is to do a milder version of what you are about to do. For example if you are going to perform weighted squats in your workout, your warm up should include some shallow bodyweight squats to prepare you physically and...

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Shoulder Pain

Uncategorized Aug 08, 2020

Unfortunately, shoulder pain is quite a prevalent issue in the over 55 population due to conditions such as osteoarthritis and rotator cuff problems. These conditions are often very limiting and prevent people from being active and doing the things they enjoy. We thought we would clarify some common misconceptions around shoulder pain and what the best approach is to improve symptoms and function.  

 

I can’t lift my arms overhead so I shouldn’t do any exercises where I have to lift my arms above shoulder height?

There are several conditions that can cause shoulder pain when lifting your hands over head – which can make tasks like hanging out the washing or putting away crockery very frustrating and challenging. Regardless of the condition, avoiding the overhead movements will not help you improve your capacity to lift overhead. Just like a student who fails a maths test, the best way to prepare for the next test is to study. The same principle...

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Pelvic Floor Health and Exercise

Uncategorized Aug 08, 2020

Pelvic floor health issues are extremely common, particularly in the female population. Exercise is known to sometimes exacerbate the symptoms of pelvic floor dysfunction. Though on the other hand, exercise is crucial to good health. Unfortunately there is insufficient research in this area to make broad, definitive statements in regards to the connection between exercise and the pelvic floor. This blog will therefore provide an overview of the pelvic floor and make exercise recommendations based on our understanding of the current evidence.

 

 What is the Pelvic Floor?

The pelvic floor muscles lie at the base of the pelvis. The main roles of these muscles are support of the pelvic organs, bladder and bowel control and sexual function.

 

 What are Pelvic Floor Health Issues?

Females are much more likely to experience symptoms of pelvic floor problems, due to their anatomy and physiology. Some of the common experiences of pelvic floor issues are:

  • Urinary...
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Pain

Uncategorized Aug 08, 2020

 

  Pain! What is it good for, absolutely nothing!

Well actually, that’s not true. Pain is a very important evolutionary mechanism. It has evolved over millions of years to protect us, and keep us safe from harm. However, like many other evolutionary mechanisms (such as the drive to eat fatty and sugary foods!) it doesn't always serve our best interests. 

 


What is pain?

If you google search a definition of pain, you might find something like this: 

“Pain is a highly unpleasant physical sensation caused by illness or injury.”

But that’s not actually very accurate. Recent developments in pain science have changed the way we think and talk about pain, in important ways. A definition of pain that more appropriately fits our current understanding, would be something like this:

“Pain is an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage.”

If those two definitions don’t look...

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Osteoporosis

Uncategorized Aug 08, 2020

Osteoporosis is a major health concern for many Be Mobile Clients both in our studio and online. Many people with osteoporosis are concerned about exercise, especially resistance training for various reasons. This blog will address some of these questions and concerns. But first, let’s clarify a few things about osteoporosis.

 

What is Osteoporosis?

Osteoporosis translated from ancient Greek means “porous bone”. It is a skeletal condition where there is a decrease in bone mineral density - classically seen in post-menopausal women. Osteoporosis is diagnosed by a bone density scan. A T score of -2.5 or below indicates osteoporosis whereas a score between -1 to 2.5 indicates osteopenia - a milder form of bone mineral density loss.

 

Why is it important to be aware of?

Osteoporosis significantly increases the risk of fractures resulting from falls. It also makes the skeleton less resilient to stress which can result in conditions like vertebral compression...

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Hip Osteoarthritis

Uncategorized Aug 08, 2020

Here at Be Mobile Physiotherapy, a lot of people come to us with Hip Osteoarthritis. Understandably, there are a lot of concerns and misconceptions surrounding this condition. Today we thought we would address some of these, but also provide some guidance around what to do to help improve your symptoms so that you can get moving and do the things you love.

 

Q. My hips are worn out from all the sports I used to play.  Isn’t exercise doing more damage?
A. Unlike the joints in a car, our hips don’t simply wear out and need to be replaced after a long period of time. In fact, exercise is very important to keep our joints healthy and happy. 

Cartilage does not have a blood supply like our muscles and bones, so it has to get its nutrients from the surrounding synovial fluid in the joint. Think of cartilage-like a sponge. When we exercise, we compress the sponge, and then when we recover the sponge expands, sucking in all the nutrients from the synovial...

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Back Pain

Uncategorized Aug 08, 2020

Back pain is extremely common. In fact, about 84% of people worldwide will experience back pain at some point in their lives. Given the prevalence of back pain, we thought it would be good to talk about some of the common myths we hear and give some tips about managing and preventing back pain.

 

Q. Lifting heavy weights, especially with a bent back is bad.
A. Just like lifting weights makes muscles stronger, lifting weights makes the
back stronger and more resilient. Of course, lifting something awkwardly or a
load you are unaccustomed too can be a factor that contributes to pain, just
like any other part of your body. However, we know that an appropriate
resistance training program that starts with manageable loads and builds up
slowly is safe and beneficial. Research has also not demonstrated an
associating between lifting with a bent back and pain. The human body is
very adaptable and as long as you start low and go slow, it is very unlikely
that you will injury yourself.

 

Q....

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Press Play

Uncategorized Jun 24, 2020

This is one for the ladies (or the men that wish to understand the wonderful women in their lives a little better). Menopause. Some of you may be there and others may have this time ahead of you. 

Just because it has ‘pause’ in the name does not mean you have to physically pause areas of your life - particularly exercise. 

Menopause is defined as the cessation of menstruation for 12months. Menopause occurs when the ovaries stop making the hormones estrogen and progesterone. The average age of menopause onset is approximately 51 years old but some women may enter menopause as early as 30 or as late as their 60s. Every women’s experience is unique but some common symptoms include hot flushes, night sweats, vaginal dryness, insomnia, headache, lethargy/fatigue, irritability, anxiety, depression, feelings of a racing heart, weight gain, joint pain and decreased strength of connective tissue. The risk of diseases including heart disease and osteoporosis also...

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